11/22/63 By Stephen King

11/22/63

click on cover to buy from Amazon

A bit of memory makes it fairly obvious from the title –11/22/63 – that this story involves the assassination of J.F. K. By creating an enthralling science fiction plot – as only Stephen King can do – the author provides strong character development, drama laced with humor, and a captivating story that clamors for more.

The protagonist, Jake Epping, discovers an extraordinary phenomena. The ability to travel back into the past. But there is one catch. No matter how many times he drops back in time, his visit always begins on September 9th, 1958 (Stephen King’s humor at work here).

Welcome to the world of Eisenhower, the cold war, segregation, hot cars, cheap gas, and rock and roll. If you lived through that era you will surely enjoy the nostalgia… TV shows, words to old songs, cigarette billboards, and high school hops. Born in 1947, Stephen King is a pro at depicting life in this era.

And if it is really possible to travel into the past, isn’t it also possible to alter events, perhaps prevent a murder and save an innocent life? Jake Epping and a trusted friend develop a plan to test that theory. And if it works, Jake will pay a visit to the past and stay until 1963 with the objective of saving Kennedy’s life.

Intrigued by the conspiracy theories, King did extensive research before writing this captivating story. Most of the details about Lee Harvey Oswald and his family, Jack Ruby, and other pertinent people were all based on fact.

King explores the oddity of experiencing startling coincidences and the eerie feeling of deja’ vu. And all through the drama, he demonstrates the epitome of suffering the consequences of ones actions… bad karma.

Not normally a fan of “time travel” stories, with 11/22/63 I make an exception. I loved this book. Of all the Stephen King novels, in my opinion, 11/22/63 holds third place… coming in just after It and The Stand. However, one warning. Stephen King’s books are always loaded with violence, death, and lots of bloodshed. Particularly in this book, King is very descriptive – sometimes excessively brutal – occasionally difficult to read because it seems to be very real.

Rated 5 Stars… in the horror science fiction genre.

All contents © 2014 Lois Weisberg. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: